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CONTACT Mail: paul@paulgilman.net Phone: 229-415-0478
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ABOUT

A Work In Perennial Progress I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.

Avionics Technician

My home will always be the McDonnell Douglas F-15. I cut my teeth troubleshooting and repairing avionics systems on the Eagle. I’ve ‘fond’ memories lying upside down in the cockpit with head in one foot well, arm in the other trying to keep blood in fingers while safety wiring some thingamajig. Specialties: Radar, Navigation, Penetration Aids, Radios, Control Systems.

Avionics Instructor

I devoted 5 years teaching tech school students the fine art of aircraft maintenance. Talk about getting out of your comfort zone… I hate public speaking! No really, I despise it. But I’ve always tried to challenge myself in new and interesting ways. Greatest memory…. mentoring these bright Airmen and helping them develop into the future leaders of the Air Force. This was where I taught myself to code with Visual Basic for Applications

VBA Programmer

Have code, will travel. Ever since that fateful morning when a coworker introduced me to VBA, I’ve tried to automate everything with a screen attached to it. I immediately figured out how to automate excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. I saw a need for tracking precision measurement equipment used in the schoolhouse, so I built a tool. We had students that were having difficulty grasping some key information, so I created a virtual, automated cockpit that instructors could fly around and show how things worked.

Programs Manager

I was looking for new challenges and an opportunity arose away from aircraft so I jumped on it. I secured a position working directly for the Squadron Commander in the programs office. I initially was the safety manager for the squadron, ensuring compliance and answering for safety violations within the organization. Here, I learned SharePoint, and built the Squadron’s first SharePoint site, which was eventually adopted by most of the installation. Soon after, I was promoted to Resource Advisor, responsible for the day to day financial operations of the squadron. Greatest achievement -- My first year there, I was able to secure an additional $170K in end of year funding due to outstanding planning and documentation. This was during a time of significant spending cut backs for the Federal Govt. Those funds were used for facilities improvement contracts and other morale building opportunities.

Analyst - Training Systems Acq

The USAF likes its toys, and especially likes shiny new toys. As a training systems acquisition analyst, we’re charged with identifying the best way to train these systems and what training devices best support the training objectives. We’ve analyzed the President’s Red Phone, GPS Satellites, Aircraft Systems, and have even worked Nuclear Missile training systems. Take an aircraft for an example, think of every system on that aircraft, that includes panels, wheels, landing gear, lights, oxygen, radar, fuel systems, navigation……. Then think of all the different specialties of people that maintain a particular type of aircraft. You can imagine the difficulty we engage in. These programs can take 18 months and have to align with the procurement milestones for systems acquisition. We’ve had to analyse 70k+ tasks in a two- week period to ensure we met obligations. We’ve even analyzed a ‘white’ aircraft (aka ‘pretend’) at the beginning of Milestone A before Big Air Force even knew what they wanted to purchase.

Training Systems Development

Upon arrival as a training systems Acquisition Analyst I noticed there were some things that I could improve right away. But first, I had to learn Microsoft Access and learn to program it. I was able to make significant improvements to our procedures in quick order. I developed a tool to import and extract raw data from text documents, technical manuals, pdfs, etc. My tool enabled analysts to analyse vast quantities of data extremely quickly and more accurately than before. What once took 3 to 4 weeks, was accomplished in 3 to 4 days and was an even better product. I then set myself on the task of automating our Access databases. This was more difficult, because I had to completely redo processes, but make the interface the same as the analysts had grown accustomed to. I think it was a success, and now new systems can easily be analyzed quicker, more accurately and with less monotony required for the analysts.

FACTS

What do you call cheese that doesn’t belong to you? …… Nacho Cheese
I’ve spent most of my adult life in the United States Air Force, It’s kinda scary to think about it, really. I’ve reached the end of that road, and am now looking for a new path and opportunities. I’ve always had an interest in Information Technology, and found a passion for systems automation and process improvement through technology. A couple years ago, I was on an airplane flying back from Colorado Springs after a particularly arduous session analyzing 40 thousand GPS training tasks and struck up a conversation with an Air Force Colonel who was sitting next to me. He told me a little about his job and I was intrigued. He told me about how someone was able to hack a Jeep to take it over, and I was hooked! I found my direction, but had no idea how to pursue it or break into cyber. Shortly afterward, I attended a military transition summit and sat in on a talk from a Microsoft rep about this amazing program they were getting ready to roll out, but it was pretty far off, and my luck isn’t that good. This was around 2016, and I never forgot about it. In the time since, I started to pursue a Master’s degree in Information Systems Management though Florida Institute of Technology.
In the more recent past, I attended a military transition town hall and was introduced to Ms. Deborah Oliver and the fascinating Microsoft Software and Systems Academy (MSSA)!!! And guess what… that they were actually standing it up on my Base-- #winning. I weighed my options of reenlisting again or retiring and enrolling in the MSSA. Honestly, it was no contest, what an amazing opportunity! My supervision all stood behind me and allowed me to attend while on Active Duty under the Career Skills Program. So, when I actually retire, I’ll be qualified for a new career in cyber security. This isn’t an easy course, ‘extremely challenging’ would be a nice way to put it. It’s literally school from 8 am to 4 pm then studying from 6 to 2 am for just about five months straight. I’ve heard the term drinking from a fire hose used before, but never really felt it applied until now. Holy crap! Our instructor is amazing, and has a ton of experience. I really feel this a well- rounded program, and builds from the ground up with a good foundation of Cyber Assurance training and experience. I am truly hopeful for what is to come and feed prepared to take care of my family into the future.
 
 
Thomas Alva Edison

ABOUT

A Work In Perennial Progress I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.
I’ve spent most of my adult life in the United States Air Force, It’s kinda scary to think about it, really. I’ve reached the end of that road, and am now looking for a new path and opportunities. I’ve always had an interest in Information Technology, and found a passion for systems automation and process improvement through technology. A couple years ago, I was on an airplane flying back from Colorado Springs after a particularly arduous session analyzing 40 thousand GPS training tasks and struck up a conversation with an Air Force Colonel who was sitting next to me. He told me a little about his job and I was intrigued. He told me about how someone was able to hack a Jeep to take it over, and I was hooked! I found my direction, but had no idea how to pursue it or break into cyber. Shortly afterward, I attended a military transition summit and sat in on a talk from a Microsoft rep about this amazing program they were getting ready to roll out, but it was pretty far off, and my luck isn’t that good. This was around 2016, and I never forgot about it. In the time since, I started to pursue a Master’s degree in Information Systems Management though Florida Institute of Technology.
In the more recent past, I attended a military transition town hall and was introduced to Ms. Deborah Oliver and the fascinating Microsoft Software and Systems Academy (MSSA)!!! And guess what… that they were actually standing it up on my Base-- #winning. I weighed my options of reenlisting again or retiring and enrolling in the MSSA. Honestly, it was no contest, what an amazing opportunity! My supervision all stood behind me and allowed me to attend while on Active Duty under the Career Skills Program. So, when I actually retire, I’ll be qualified for a new career in cyber security. This isn’t an easy course, ‘extremely challenging’ would be a nice way to put it. It’s literally school from 8 am to 4 pm then studying from 6 to 2 am for just about five months straight. I’ve heard the term drinking from a fire hose used before, but never really felt it applied until now. Holy crap! Our instructor is amazing, and has a ton of experience. I really feel this a well-rounded program, and builds from the ground up with a good foundation of Cyber Assurance training and experience. I am truly hopeful for what is to come and feed prepared to take care of my family into the future.

Avionics Technician

My home will always be the McDonnell Douglas F-15. I cut my teeth troubleshooting and repairing avionics systems on the Eagle. I’ve ‘fond’ memories lying upside down in the cockpit with head in one foot well, arm in the other trying to keep blood in fingers while safety wiring some thingamajig. Specialties: Radar, Navigation, Penetration Aids, Radios, Control Systems.

Avionics Instructor

I devoted 5 years teaching tech school students the fine art of aircraft maintenance. Talk about getting out of your comfort zone… I hate public speaking! No really, I despise it. But I’ve always tried to challenge myself in new and interesting ways. Greatest memory…. mentoring these bright Airmen and helping them develop into the future leaders of the Air Force. This was where I taught myself to code with Visual Basic for Applications

VBA Programmer

Have code, will travel. Ever since that fateful morning when a coworker introduced me to VBA, I’ve tried to automate everything with a screen attached to it. I immediately figured out how to automate excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. I saw a need for tracking precision measurement equipment used in the schoolhouse, so I built a tool. We had students that were having difficulty grasping some key information, so I created a virtual, automated cockpit that instructors could fly around and show how things worked.

Programs Manager

I was looking for new challenges and an opportunity arose away from aircraft so I jumped on it. I secured a position working directly for the Squadron Commander in the programs office. I initially was the safety manager for the squadron, ensuring compliance and answering for safety violations within the organization. Here, I learned SharePoint, and built the Squadron’s first SharePoint site, which was eventually adopted by most of the installation. Soon after, I was promoted to Resource Advisor, responsible for the day to day financial operations of the squadron. Greatest achievement -- My first year there, I was able to secure an additional $170K in end of year funding due to outstanding planning and documentation. This was during a time of significant spending cut backs for the Federal Govt. Those funds were used for facilities improvement contracts and other morale building opportunities.

Analyst - Training Systems Acq

The USAF likes its toys, and especially likes shiny new toys. As a training systems acquisition analyst, we’re charged with identifying the best way to train these systems and what training devices best support the training objectives. We’ve analyzed the President’s Red Phone, GPS Satellites, Aircraft Systems, and have even worked Nuclear Missile training systems. Take an aircraft for an example, think of every system on that aircraft, that includes panels, wheels, landing gear, lights, oxygen, radar, fuel systems, navigation……. Then think of all the different specialties of people that maintain a particular type of aircraft. You can imagine the difficulty we engage in. These programs can take 18 months and have to align with the procurement milestones for systems acquisition. We’ve had to analyse 70k+ tasks in a two- week period to ensure we met obligations. We’ve even analyzed a ‘white’ aircraft (aka ‘pretend’) at the beginning of Milestone A before Big Air Force even knew what they wanted to purchase.

Training Systems Development

Upon arrival as a training systems Acquisition Analyst I noticed there were some things that I could improve right away. But first, I had to learn Microsoft Access and learn to program it. I was able to make significant improvements to our procedures in quick order. I developed a tool to import and extract raw data from text documents, technical manuals, pdfs, etc. My tool enabled analysts to analyse vast quantities of data extremely quickly and more accurately than before. What once took 3 to 4 weeks, was accomplished in 3 to 4 days and was an even better product. I then set myself on the task of automating our Access databases. This was more difficult, because I had to completely redo processes, but make the interface the same as the analysts had grown accustomed to. I think it was a success, and now new systems can easily be analyzed quicker, more accurately and with less monotony required for the analysts.

FACTS

What do you call cheese that doesn’t belong to you? …… Nacho Cheese
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SOCIAL
ADDRESS 1234 Main Street Anytown, USA 123456
CONTACT Mail: contact@company name.com Phone: 030 49808100
Paul Gilman
Paul Gilman